Is Oregano Oil the New Argan Oil? and What makes It So Special?

Is Oregano Oil the New Argan Oil? and What makes It So Special?
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From muscle aches, skin problems and upset stomachs to sore throats, headaches, athlete’s foot, and so much more, oil can help.

I know what you’re thinking: “How can some spice in my grandmother’s kitchen help me?” Well, for starters, it’s not the same oregano you put on your food. This type of oregano (Origanum Vulgare), has been found to soothe multiple health issues and ailments. The one in your grandmother’s kitchen (Origanum Marjoram) is probably great in your food, but don’t go rubbing that one on your skin!

But seriously, if you are looking for alternative ways to address some of your health issues and discomforts, read on.

Oregano oil helps with all of that?!

You’ve probably heard a bit about the power of oils and aromatherapy. For instance, lavender is great for sleeping and peppermint oil is known to help ease headaches. But what about oregano oil? Oregano oil, which is similar to tea tree oil, also has many healing benefits and is known to treat or help prevent an assortment of health issues. According to WebMD, it can help with: [1]

  • Coughs
  • Asthma
  • Bronchitis
  • Heartburn
  • Menstrual cramps
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Urinary tract disorders
  • Headaches
  • Heart conditions

This is just a small sampling of what oregano oil can do. It’s also known for its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, among other benefits.

Side effects of using Oregano Oil

As with anything you put in your body, it’s always good to consult your doctor before trying a new supplement as well as to get a general overview of your health. That’s because people can have various reactions. For instance, oregano oil has not been tested with pregnant women, so pregnant women should avoid. [2]

Also, if you use it in high doses, it could cause skin irritation. And if you know you’ve already had negative reactions with other oils such as mint, sage, basil, marjoram or lavender, you may want to steer clear of oregano oil. [3]

You Can Use Oregano Oil In Many Ways

Oregano oil can be taken in a few ways. Some people ingest it by mouth either by taking the oil or the pill form. You can also simply rub it on the skin. For example, for issues such as fatigue, ear infections, sinus pain, allergies and more, you can take it by mouth. Some people with ear aches or sore throat simply mix a few drops in a glass of water to alleviate their pain. [4] In addition, you can apply it to the skin for things like bug bites, athlete’s foot, psoriasis, ringworm and muscle pain. [5]

You Can Either buy it or make your own

You can buy oregano oil at most big-name store chains as well as health food stores. However, you can also make it yourself, but it can take a while. Want to try? [6]

You will need chopped oregano leaves, grape seed, almond or olive oil (just choose one), and 2 clean, sanitized jars with lids. Boil water in a saucepan, then turn off the heat after it has reached the boiling point. Put your oil and oregano leaves in the jar. Place the jar in the boiled water and leave it in there a few minutes, about 5 to 10.

Take the jar out and make sure you place it in an area where there will be plenty of sunlight. Leave it for about two weeks, but be sure to shake the jar every couple of days. After you let it sit for a couple of weeks, strain oil from the leaves and put into another clean, sanitized jar. It doesn’t need to be refrigerated, just store in a cool, dry place.

While oregano oil may not have been an oil you have been extremely familiar with, there’s no denying it has healing benefits that you are sure to find useful.

Featured photo credit: Pex via static.pexels.com

Reference

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