These Statistics On Our Cellphone Addiction Are Terrifying And More Alarming Than Ever

These Statistics On Our Cellphone Addiction Are Terrifying And More Alarming Than Ever
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Ah, the cell phone, our trusty friend. It helps us pretend we’re busy when we don’t want to talk to the person next to us. It helps us keep connected to an endless stream of cat videos. We may also have a tendency to stare at it, with a glazed expression, endlessly waiting for a message that will never arrive. I jest, but the truth is that we have an increasingly unhealthy fixation to our smartphones, recent surveys suggest.

The following show an increase in cell phone , with participants admitting to becoming increasingly disconnected with their actual surroundings in the name of ‘data connectivity’.

The average person checks a cell phone is 110 times a day

Human beings are naturally fidgety creatures. We touch our faces a crazy amount of times per day. We doodle to distraction, and we love gadgets. The ultimate modern person’s form of fidgeting though, is looking at their smartphones. Why did I just unlock my phone? Was I going to look at Twitter? Oh, I can’t remember, let’s look anyway!

Recent research, collected by Android app Locket, monitored how many times its 150,000 users checked their phone in a day. They found that users did this a staggering 110 times a day,[1] whilst another study carried out by Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers found the average user checks their phone nearer to 150 times per day. That’s a lot of time that could be spent honing a discipline. A musical instrument could be a great way to channel that nervous fidgety energy, whilst reading helps us to become focused.[2]

1 in 5 people aged 18-34 have used their smartphones during sex

Oh, the modern world! For every incredible benefit that technology brings us, there seems to be an equally compelling argument that it dulls us to distraction. In a survey carried out by Harris Interactive for ID verification startup Jumio, this surprising statistic came to light. Nearly 20 percent of young adult smartphone owners between the ages of 18 and 34 in the U.S. have said they use their smartphones during sex.[3]

No wonder new age positivity mind-set literature is turning into such a strong subculture. We need someone fighting the present tense’s corner when so many people seem so inclined to escape the moment they’re in. If someone can’t value the person they’re with during such an intimate act, what are the chances they place little value on other things that make their life what it is? Maybe it’s time to re-connect with the little things in life that make us happy.

77% of parents and teens have argued about smartphone usage

A less surprising statistic perhaps, but no less worrying. According to a poll carried out by Common Sense Media, 50% of teens feel they have cell phone addiction, and the majority have argued with their parents over device usage.[4]

In an example of the sacrifices we’ll make to stay connected, Terry Greenwald, a father of three and custodian at a high school in Homer, Alaska, told CNN that the hallways where he works are often half-filled with “teenage zombies who are glued to their phones.”

50% of people feel uneasy when they leave phones at home

Is increased connectivity worth it if losing a device starts to feel like we’re losing control of our lives? This is already becoming a problem. A 2010 study by the UK Post Office found that nearly 53 percent of mobile phone users in Britain become anxious when they can’t use their devices. The reason was primarily that they feared missing calls or messages.

Nomophobia. Remember the word.[5] The way things are going it’ll probably be in much more common usage in years to come.

Sadly, it’s important to note that missing a message doesn’t mean the end of the world. Some people in the tech industry take measures to drive this home. Steve Hilton, head of a Silicon Valley tech startup doesn’t use a phone.[6] Other bigwig CEO’s use flip phones as they feel the reduced functionality helps them to disconnect.[7]

26% of car accidents are caused by phone usage

Sadly, cell phone addiction can also lead to loss of life if a person is so attached to their phone that they use it recklessly. A recent NSC report has shown that 1 in 4 car accidents are caused by cell phone usage.[8] The NSC also feel that the statistics may be higher as not all drivers are willing to admit using their smartphones whilst driving.

The findings also revealed the surprising statistic that only 5% of smartphone related crashes occur because the driver is texting. The majority occur whilst a driver is distracted talking on hands-free. There’s a very obvious solution to this. Unless it’s an emergency, the conversation can most likely wait.

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The post These Statistics On Our Cellphone Addiction Are Terrifying And More Alarming Than Ever appeared first on Lifehack.

Also find additional reading by Sean Jackson : “HOW TO BREAK SMARTPHONE ADDICTION STEP BY STEP GUIDE” (https://www.moneysavingpro.com/cell-phone-plans/phone-addiction/)

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